What’s the difference between UL, ETL, CE, and CSA Certification Listing Marks ?

Now you’ll know…

The UL Mark

The UL (Underwriters Laboratories) Listing Mark

This is one of the most common UL Marks. If a product carries one of these Marks, Underwriters Laboratories found that samples of this product met UL’s safety requirements. These requirements are primarily based on UL’s own published Standards for Safety. This type of Mark is seen commonly on appliances and computer equipment, furnaces and heaters, fuses, electrical panel boards, smoke and carbon monoxide detectors, fire extinguishers and sprinkler systems, personal flotation devices like life jackets and life preservers, bullet resistant glass, and thousands of other products.

UL certifies, validates, tests, inspects, audits, and advises and trains. We provide the knowledge and expertise to help customers navigate growing complexities across the supply chain from compliance and regulatory issues to trade challenges and market access. In this way, we facilitate global trade and deliver peace of mind.

 

The Recognized Component Mark

The “Recognized Component Mark” is a type of quality mark issued by Underwriters Laboratories. It is placed on components which are intended to be part of a UL listed product, but which cannot bear the full UL logo themselves.  The general public does not ordinarily come across it, as it is borne on components which make up finished products.

Edison Testing Laboratories

The ETL Listing Mark

The ETL, Electrical Testing Laboratories, Listed Mark is proof of product compliance (electrical, gas and other safety standards) to North American safety standards.  Authorities Having Jurisdiction (AHJ’s) in 50 states and Canada and retailers accept the ETL Listed Mark as proof of product safety. Manufacturers are choosing ETL because it gives them a competitive advantage in the marketplace. Today, the ETL mark is featured on millions of products sold by major retailers. The product with ETL Listed Mark from certified by ITS. This certification mark indicates that the product has been tested to and has met the minimum requirements of a widely recognized U.S product safety standard, that the manufacturing site has been audited, and that the applicant has agreed to a program of periodic factory follow-up inspections to verify continued performance.

 

The CE Mark

The European Commission describes the CE mark as a “passport” that allows manufacturers to circulate industrial products freely within the internal market of the EU. The CE mark certifies that the products have met EU health, safety and environmental requirements that ensure consumer and workplace safety. All manufacturers in the EU and abroad must affix the CE mark to those products covered by the “New Approach” directives in order to market their products in Europe. Once a product receives the CE mark, it can be marketed throughout the EU without undergoing further product modification.

Most products covered by New Approach Directives can be self-certified by the manufacturer and do not require the intervention of an EU-authorized independent testing/certifying company (notified body). To self-certify, the manufacturer must assess the conformity of the products to the applicable directives and standards. While the use of EU harmonized standards is voluntary in theory, in practice the use of European standards is the best way to meet the requirements of the CE mark directives. This is because the standards offer specific guidelines and tests to meet safety requirements, while the directives, general in nature, do not.

The manufacturer may affix the CE mark to their product following the preparation of a declaration of conformity, the certificate which shows the product conforms to the applicable requirements. They must maintain a technical file to prove conformity. The manufacturer or their authorized representative must be able to provide this certificate together with the technical file at any time, if requested by the appropriate member state authorities.

There is no specific form for the declaration of conformity, but specific information is required. The declaration must include the following:

(1) The manufacturer’s name and address.
(2) The product.
(3) The CE mark directives that apply to the product, e.g. the machine directive 93/37/EC or the low voltage directive 73/23/EEC.
(4) The European standards used, e.g. EN 50081-2:1993 for the EMC directive or EN 60950:1991 for the low voltage requirement for information technology.
(5) The declaration must show the signature of a company official for purposes of the company assuming liability for the safety of its product in the European market. This European standards organization has set up the Electromagnetic Compatibility Directive. According to CE, The Directive basically states that products must not emit unwanted electromagnetic pollution (interference). Because there is a certain amount of electromagnetic pollution in the environment, the Directive also states that products must be immune to a reasonable amount of interference. The Directive itself gives no guidelines on the required level of emissions or immunity that is left to the standards that are used to demonstrate compliance with the Directive.

CSA (Canadian Standards Association) Mark

Canada
CSA Group has the largest subject area recognition of the SDOs accredited by the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), an organization that co-ordinates Canada’s National Standards System. We maintain our accreditation by developing consensus standards that adhere to the requirements established  by the SCC.

United States
CSA Group is accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), an organization that co-ordinates the standards strategy for the U.S. We maintain ANSI accreditation by developing consensus standards that comply with ANSI Essential Requirements.

Various sources for this information:
batteryspace.com / Wikipedia / LEDcorporations.com